Archive for the ‘Where are the Feet?’ Category

Where are the Feet?

 Where are the feet?

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The feet are pausing at the “Top of the Rock” on the 70th Floor outdoor Observation Deck at Rockefeller Center, New York, to admire and absorb the stunning views of Central Park and Midtown Manhattan.  Top of the Rock is situated on the 70th Floor of the iconic General Electric Building in Rockefeller Center and was reopened in 2005, after undergoing a $75 million renovation.  Although the deck at the Top of Rock is not as high as the Observation Centers at the Empire State Building (located on Floors 86 and 102), the views from the Top of the Rock are considered by many to be more impressive, since it includes a sweeping view of Central Park and the Upper East and Upper West sides, as well as Midtown Manhattan.

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The Top of the Rock is open to visitors from 8:00 AM to midnight, 365 days of the year.  The entrance is located on 50th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue.  Tickets may be purchased online, in advance, through the official Top of the Rock website, which can be accessed by clicking here.

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Above:  A view of the 69th Floor outdoor deck, which is encased with clear glass panels to provide unobstructed views of the city, as seen from the 70th Floor deck at the Top of the Rock.  Below: A commanding view of Central Park taken from the 70th Floor of the Top of the Rock.

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Above:  A northeast view, looking toward the Upper East side, from the Top of the Rock.  Below:  A view of the Empire State Building, located on Fifth Avenue, between 33rd and 34th Streets, and Midtown Manhattan.

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Above:  A view of the Upper West Side and the twin towers of the Time-Warner complex, located at Columbus Circle.

To go to previous posts in the “Where are the Feet” category, click here.

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet?

feet-at-point-cabrillo

The feet are pausing along the long gravel walkway leading to the Point Cabrillo Lighthouse, located between Point Arena and Cape Mendocino, in Mendocino Country, CA.  Built in 1909, the Lighthouse is named after Spanish explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo and occupies a dramatic site on a promontory overlooking the jagged Mendocino coastline.  The US Coast Guard manned the station until 1973, at which time the lighthouse was modernized with an automated, rotating beacon.  

The lighthouse building now houses an exhibit that describes the rich history of the lighthouse, with photographs and artifacts.  Souvenirs are also for sale in the lighthouse.

The lighthouse was added to the National Registry of Historic Places in 1991 and was purchased by the California State Parks in 2002.  A variety of events are planned this year in honor of the Centennial of the Point Cabrillo Lighthouse.  

The grounds are open to visitors daily from sunrise to sunset.  The lighthouse and other exhibits are open from 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM, daily.

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Above:  The sign marks the entrance of the Point Cabrillo Light Station and Preserve, which is operated by the California State Parks.  Below: A one-half mile road leads visitors along a lovely walk to the Light Station.  (Only emergency vehicles and vehicles with handicapped visitors are allowed on the roadway.)

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Above:  A view of the Light House, taken from the walkway along the bluff.  Below: A photograph taken in 1909, the year it was built.  (Photo Credit: Point Cabrillo Lightkeepers Association)

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Above and Below:  Views of the rotating, automatic light installed in 1973.

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Above:  A view of the jagged coastline surrounding the Point Cabrillo Light House.  Below:  A view of the approach to the Light House, as the fog and mist clears.

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To learn more about the Point Cabrillo Lighthouse, visit the Point Cabillo Lightkeepers Association website by clicking here.

 To go to previous entries in the “Where are the Feet?” category, click here.

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Photos taken: 7/25/09

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet?

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The feet are pausing while strolling through Central Havana to admire the amazing assortment of buildings– some grand, and some not– in various stages of preservation or decay.

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To go to previous entries in the “Where are the Feet?” category, click here.

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet?

feet-at-floradit

The feet have arrived at Restaurante Bar Floridita, in Havana, Cuba.  Floridita is a Havana landmark and is best known for their daquiris and as one of Ernest Hemingway’s favorite hangouts in Havana.  The darkly-lit, plush and upscale establishment includes a large bar with small tables and a spacious, separate dining room.  The bar is a frequent stop for tourists, particularly those who are following the “Hemingway trail” across Havana in search of trivia, memorabilia and tributes to the famous writer.

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Above:  The entrance to Restaurante Bar Floridita and its distinctively and brightly-painted exterior.  Above:  The neon sign of Floridita, which highlights their famous daquiris.

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Above:  A view of the handsome and busy bar, where hundreds of daquiris are poured each day.  Below:  Visitors often pose in front of this life-size statue of Ernest Hemingway, which is positioned at the end of the long bar at Restaurante Bar Floridita.

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To learn more about Restaurante Bar Floridita, go to their official website (available in Spanish only) by clicking here.

To go to previous entries in the “Where are the Feet?” category, click here.

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet?

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The feet are resting on the expansive and well-manicured lawn fronting the porte-cochere of the legendary Hotel Nacional de Cuba, located in Havana, Cuba.  Opened in 1930 after two years of construction, the Hotel Nacional de Cuba has 457 guest rooms and features a distinctive blend of architectural styles, including Moorish-Spanish, Art Deco, neoclassic and neocolonial.  The hotel occupies a large, impressive site atop Taganana Hill, providing stunning views of the Malecon and the blue waters beyond.

Among the many international celebrities that have stayed at the Hotel Nacional de Cuba are Frank Sinatra, Ava Gardner, Mickey Mantle, Johnny Weismuller, Buster Keaton, Errol Flynn, John Wayne, Marlene Dietrich, Gary Cooper, Marlon Brando, Ernest Hemingway, Winston Churchill, and the Duke and Duchess of Windsor .

The hotel’s dramatic and grand spaces  has served as the backdrop for numerous movies, including Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Godfather, Part II.”

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Above:  The feet are pausing to admire the marble plaque bearing the hotel’s name at the front entrance.  Below:  A view of the long and spacious main lobby, with faux wood-beamed ceilings and large chandeliers.

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Above:  A view of a portion of the exterior of the Hotel Nacional de Cuba showing the beautiful blend of architectural styles along the arched walkways and the facade of the building.  Below:  A view of the main swimming pool with views extending across the Malecon.

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Above:  A view of the famous Galeria Bar that extends the full length of the interior court of the hotel, where patrons can enjoy a cocktail and admire the beautiful, landscaped grounds while being serenaded by wandering musicians.  Below: A view of the  Hotel Nacional de Cuba, as seen from the Malecon along the seawall.

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The learn more about the history of the Hotel Nacional de Cuba or to reserve a room, go to their official website by clicking here.

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To go to previous entries in the “Where are the Feet?” category, click here.

Photos taken: 7/28/09

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet today?

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The feet are pausing to admire the beautiful sights along Paseo de Marti in Havana, Cuba, commonly known as The Prado, a 3/4-mile promenade orignally laid out in 1772, in the style of grand European boulevards.  A tree-lined pedestrian walkway separates the traffic along each side of the Paseo de Marti.  The shady boulevard, which is lined with ornate marble benches and lampposts, is the principal pedestrian walkway in Havana that provides an ideal setting for entertainment and for artists to sell their handmade crafts and paintings.

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Above:  A view of the wide, tiled pedestrian walkway that extends the full length of the Paseo de Marti.  Below:  A group of student musicians performs along the Paseo de Marti for passersby.

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To go to previous entries in the “Where are the Feet?” category, click here.

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet today?

The feet are pausing to admire the amazing, timeless beauty of the Yuyuan Gardens, located in the historic Old City of Shanghai.  Established in the mid-16th Century as a private garden for an official in the Ming Dynasty, the five-acre garden was declared a national monument in 1982 and is one of the most-popular visitor attractions in Shanghai.  The six, structured areas of the garden represent some of the best surviving examples of Chinese landscape design and craftsmanship, including a spectacular 40-foot tall rock garden.

Above: A view of one of the several beautiful pavilions located on the grounds of the Yuyuan Gardens.  Below: A view at the entrance to the Yuyuan Gardens, where I am pausing to touch the foot of the one of the most-cherished symbols of Chinese mythology and lore.

 Above:  The walls of Yuyuan Gardens are guarded by dragons, one of whom is show in the photo above.  Below:  A view of one of the many carefully and expertly shaped miniatured potted trees that were beginning to blossom throughout the Yuyuan Gardens.  Is Spring here?

Above:  A map of the intricately-designed Yuyuan Gardens, which creates an astonishing array of remarkable spaces within its tight 5-acre site.  Below:  A view of the popular tea house, located outside the Yuyuan Gardens, which was colorfully decorated for the Chinese New Year and the celebration of the Year of the Ox.

Two Photos Above and Below: Two views of the colorful and crowded shopping bazaar in the area immediately surrounding the Yuyuan Gardens.  The colorful decorations from the Chinese New Year and Lantern Celebrations were still in place throughout the city.

 To go to previous entries in the “Where are the Feet?” category, click here.  

Photos taken: 2/17/09

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet today?

The feet are standing on the clear, glass floor of the 100th Floor Observation Deck of the Shanghai World Financial Center (SWFC), located in the Pudong district of Shanghai, China.  The Shanghai World Financial Center is the tallest building in China and the second tallest building in the world, behind Taipei 101, located in Taipei, Taiwan.  The SWFC is comprised of 101 stories above ground and is 1,614 feet tall.  The building includes two floors of underground parking, three floors of retail space, commercial office space on Floors 7 to 77, the luxury Park Hyatt Shanghai Hotel on Floors 79 to 93, and an Observatory on Floors 94, 97 and 100.  The Observatory on the 100th Floor is the tallest observatory in the world, at 1,555 feet.

The building, developed by Mori Building Co. of Japan and designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, is a post-modern structure with an elegantly-tapering tower and a trapezoid-shaped opening at the top.  The building has been nicknamed “The Bottle Opener,” because its shape resembles a bottle opener, particularly when viewed from a great distance.  The building was originally designed with a circular opening at the top; however, as a result of significant protest by the Chinese government that the circle resembled the “rising sun” on the Japanese flag, the design was altered during mid-construction.

Ground was broken for the building in 1997 and construction stalled for several years due to the Asian financial crisis.  Construction finally resumed in 2003 and the building was inaugurated on 8/28/08.  When it was originally designed in 1997, the building was planned as the tallest building in the world; however, Taipei 101 claimed that title when it opened in 2004.

The Burj Dubai in Dubai, UAE, will claim the title of World’s Tallest Building when it is completed in late 2009.

Above:  A diagram showing the composition of the Shanghai World Financial Center, China’s tallest building.  Below:  A rendering of the building, as constructed, with the trapezoid-shaped opening at the top, which is used to reduce resistance to the high winds in Shanghai.

Above and Below:  The observatory on the 100th Floor of the Shanghai World Financial Center is the highest observatory in the world.

Above:  The 100th Floor Observatory features a 180-foot long, glass-floored and glass-walled promenade the stretches the width of the building, offering spectacular views of the Pudong area and Shanghai.  Below:  A view of the elegant spire of the Jin Mao Building (in the foreground) , which was China’s tallest building prior to the construction of the SWFC, the Pearl Tower (with the brightly-colored sphere), and the Huangpu River.

Above: A view of new housing constructed in Pudong, as seen from the 100th Floor Observatory of the SWFC.  Below:  A view of the towering Shanghai World Financial Center, shrouded in mist, taken in the early evening from the porte-cochere of the Grand Hyatt Shanghai in the neighboring Jin Mao Tower.

The SFWC Observatory is open from 8:00 AM to 11:00 PM, daily.  Ticket prices are roughly $21 for admission to all three floors of the Observatory.

If you want to read more about the world’s tallest buildings, visit Skyscraperpage.com or Emporis.com.

To go to previous entries in the “Where are the Feet?” category, click here.

 

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet today? 

The feet are resting at the Ancient Silk Road Monument, located in Xian, China, which commemorates the founding of the “silk road” in Xian (previously known as Chang’an).  Dubbed the “silk road” by German geographer Ferdinand von Richthofen in 1877, the silk road was an extensive interconnected network of trade routes across the Asian continent connecting Eastern, Southern and Western Asia with the Mediterranean world, including North Africa and Europe.  Established in the 2nd century B.C., during the Han Dynasty, the silk route eventually encompassed a network of land and sea routes spanning over 5,000 miles. 

Above:  The sign at the Ancient Silk Road Monument, in Xian.  Below:  A map showing the land (in blue) and sea (in red) routes of the Silk Road.

Three photos Below:  Views of the Ancient Silk Road Monument in Xian, China.

To go to previous entries in the “Where are the Feet?” category, click here.  

Photos taken: 2/11/09 

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet today?

The feet are pausing along the walkway to the Puning Temple, or Temple of Peace, located near the Chengde Mountain Resort in Chengde, Hebei Province.  The temple, which is commonly referred to as the “Big Buddha Temple,” is one of the “Eight Outer Temples” of Chengde and a UNESCO World Heritage site.  The temple was built in 1755 during the reign of the Qianlong Emperor and was intended to show the Qing’s respect to the ethnic minorities by being modeled after the Samye Monastery, the Lamaist site in Tibet and constructed in both Chinese and Tibetan architectural styles.  The Puning Temple houses the world’s tallest wooden sculpture of Bodhisattva Avalokitesvara (72 feet).

Above and Below:  Two views of the first large temple within the Puning Temple complex, built in a Chinese architectural style.

Above:  A view of the Tibetan prayer wheels within the Puning Temple complex.  Below:  A view of the rooftops of the many structures within Puning Temple.

Above:  Monks in prayer and meditation at the Puning Temple.  Below: A view of the 72-foot tall wooden statue of Buddha inside the Puning Temple.

Below:  A view of the large natural rock formation, called the “Sledgehammer Rock,” since its shape resembles an inverted sledgehammer.  The formation dominates the horizon and can be seen from almost any location in the Chengde Mountain Resort, including the Puning Temple, where this photo was taken.

 

To go to previous entries in the “Where are the Feet?” category, click here.  

 Photos taken: 2/8/09

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet today?

The feet are taking a short rest atop a crest in the undulating walkway on The Great Wall of China at Mutianyu, in Huairou County, located about 50 miles northeast of Beijing.  The Mutianyu section of the Great Wall features one of the best-preserved stretches of the wall, which served as the northern barrier defending the capital and the imperial tombs.  Constructed primarily of granite, the 1.5 mile stretch at Mutianyu is 23-26 feet high and the top is 13 to 15 feet feet wide.

The Great Wall at Mutianyu was first built in the mid-6th century during the Northern Qi dynasty.  During the Ming dynasty, construction of the present wall began on the foundation of the original wall of the Northern Qi dynasty.  The wall was subsequently rebuilt in 1569 and most parts are still well-preserved.  According to some experts, the Great Wall at Mutainyu has the largest construction scale and best quality among all sections of the Great Wall.

The Great Wall at Mutianyu is older than the Badaling section of the Great Wall, which is the most-visited section of the Great Wall due to its close (25 miles) proximity to Beijing.  During our first visit to the Great Wall in 1998, we drove to the more remote area of Simatai, located about 75 miles northeast of Beijing, where the wall remains largely unrestored and where there are relatively few visitors.  The Simatai section of the Great Wall is about 3.5 miles in length, with 35 watchtowers, and has been designated as a World Cultural Heritage site by UNESCO.

On the day of our visit to Mutianyu, the skies were clear and sunny and the temperature was in the low 50’s.  Since this is the low season for tourism in China, the crowds on the Great Wall were fairly small.  Along some portions of the wall, there were no other visitors in view.  

 

To go to previous entries in the “Where are the Feet?” category, click here.  

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet today?

The feet are resting on the artificial turf inside the Beijing National Stadium, located within the Olympic Green complex in Beijing, China.  The stadium was built for and used during the 2008 Olypmic Games and is affectionately called the “Bird’s Nest,” in reference to its striking lattice-style frame that resembles a bird’s nest.  The now iconic stadium is probably one of the most-recognized buildings in the world, given that the hugely-popular opening and closing ceremonies of the 2008 Olympic games were performed in and broadcast from the stadium.  The 2008 Olympic Games have already been named “the most watched TV event in history,” with an estimated global audience of 4.7 billion people. 

The National Stadium was designed by the Swiss architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron following an international design competition.  Built at a cost of $423 million, the stadium is the largest steel structure in the world, with a total permanent seating capacity of 80,000.  For the Olympic games, the seating was expanded to 91,000 through the use of temporary seating.

Today, the National Stadium sits largely unused, except as a tourist attraction.  On the day of our visit (during the Lunar New Year celebration), the stadium was filled with thousands of visitors who each paid $10 in order to walk inside the stadium grounds.  The surrounding Olmypic Green was also crowded with families who were celebrating the Lunar New Year.

Inside the stadium, entertainers dressed as the Olympic mascots danced to music, much to the delight of the hundreds of children who were visiting the Bird Nest. 

 

Although the stadium is visually stunning and the source of great national pride in China, I can easily imagine it becoming a real-estate “white elephant” unless it begins to regularly host large events or an alternative use is found.  According to some published reports, as well as our tour guide in Beijing, plans have been proposed to convert portions of the open space in the Olympic Green complex to mixed use retail/entertainment/dining in order to help build traffic, which seems like a good thing.

Adjacent to the Olympic Green is a striking five-building complex, built in the shape of a Chinese dragon, that houses the new Pangu 7-Star Hotel, a 223-room luxury hotel which officially opened for business in December 2008.  The Pangu Plaza complex is another example of the bold new architecture that is reshaping the skyline of Beijing.

To learn more about the Pangu 7-Star Hotel or to book reservations, visit the official website by clicking  here.

To go to previous entries in the “Where are the Feet?” category, click here.  

Photo Credit: Aerial photo of Pangu 7-Star Hotel by Associated Press/ The New York Times

Photos taken: 2/8/09

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet today?

The feet are pausing along the outdoor pool at The Contemporary Museum Honolulu (TCM) , in Makiki Heights, Honolulu.  The Contemporary Museum is the only museum in the State of Hawaii devoted exclusively to contemporary art.  TCM presents its innovative exhibition and education programs at two venues in Hionolulu– at the historic Cooke-Spalding house in Makiki Heights and the First Hawaiian Center in downtown Honolulu.

In addition to the galleries, TCM in Makiki Heights, which opened its doors in 1988, includes the Museum Shop, The Contemporary Cafe, and administrative offices.  Museum hours are 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM, Tuesday through Saturday, and 12:00 MP to 4:00 PM on Sundays.   

Above:  An exterior view of the historic Cooke-Spalding House, located in a residential area of Makiki Heights, which was extensively remodeled in 1988 to serve as home for The Contemporary Museum.  Below: One of the magnificent, large trees in the outdoor gardens of the museum.

Below:  A view of Diamond Head from the grounds surrounding The Contemporary Museum in Makiki Heights.

To visit the official website of The Contemporary Museum and to learn more about its exhibits and other services, click here.

To go to previous entries in the “Where are the Feet?” category, click here.  

Photos taken: 1/23/09

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet today?

 

The feet are pausing to admire the view of the beautiful and much beloved Na Mokulua, which means “the two islands” in Hawaiian, situated off Lanikai, a neighborhood of Kailua, Oahu, Hawaii.  The larger island is Moku Nui and the smaller, Moku Iki.  These much-photographed islets are State bird sanctuaries and access is regulated by law. 

My childhood home was located in a residential development called Country Club Knoll, near Lanikai Elementary School, which a short distance from the section of Lanikai Beach where these photos were taken.  I spent many sunny days at Lanikai Beach enjoying the spectacular white, powdered sand and the amazing view of the Mokulua Islands.  Lanikai Beach, and its neighboring Kailua Beach, have been cited as among the best beaches in the world for their calm, clean water, fine sand, and exceptional views.

Above:  View of Moku Nui, the larger of the two Mokulua islets, located off Lanikai Beach in Kailua, Hawaii.  Below:  A view of the two Mokulua islets and the small beachside community of Lanikai from Kaiwa Ridge. 

To view the location on Mapquest where the photos at top were taken, click here.

To go to previous entries in the “Where are the Feet?” category, click here.  

Photos taken: 1/26/09

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet today?

The feet are relaxing on the beach at Kualoa Regional Park in Kaneohe Bay on the Island of Oahu, Hawaii.  In the distance is Mokoli’i, a 12-acre, 206-foot tall basalt island, situated one-third of a mile offshore of Kualoa Point.  It is also known as “Chinaman’s Hat” for its likeness to the straw hats previously worn in Hawaii by Chinese immigrants.  As a child living in Hawaii, this was one of my favorite island landmarks and a symbol of mystery and Hawaiian folklore. 

Kualoa Park features excellent beaches for swimming, as well as campgrounds, picnic tables, and outdoor grills.  The park is framed by Kaneohe Bay and the dramatic cliffs of the Kualoa mountains, part of the Koolau Range.

Above:  Entrance sign to the Kualoa Regional Park in Kanehe, Oahu, Hawaii.  Below:  A close-up view of Moloki’i Island (also called “Chinaman’s Hat”), situated offshore at Kualoa Park.

Below:  A view of the Kualoa Mountains on the Koolau Range, which flank the Kualoa Regional Park and provide a dramatic backdrop of the beautiful beach.

To learn more about Kualoa Regional Park, visit the City and County of Honolulu’s official website by clicking here.

To view previous entries in the “Where are the Feet?” category, click here.  

Photos taken: 1/25/09.
Kualoa Park Sign Credit: TraveltoHawaiiReviewed.com

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet today?

The feet are relaxing on a grassy patch opposite Opaeka’a Falls, a 150-foot waterfall in Kapa’a, Kauai that helps supply water to the beautiful Wailua River.

Above:  Entrance sign to the Wailua River State Park, in Kapa’a, Kauai, which offers picnic areas and a boat ramp for access to the lovely Wailua River, the State’s only navigable river.  Passengers board commercial boats for the ride to the famous Fern Grotto, located along the Wailua River.  Below: A view of the Wailua River, taken opposite the Opaeka’a Falls.

Above:  A view of the Wailua River, taken near the mouth of the river, in Kapa’a, Kauai.  Below:  A view of the nearby Wailua Falls, an 80-foot waterfall which also feeds the Wailua River.

To view previous entries in the “Where are the Feet?” category, click here.  

Photos Taken: 1/19/09

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet today?

The feet are resting after taking a long stroll along the sandy beach at Hanalei Bay, the largest bay on the North Shore of Kauai, Hawaii.  The beatutiful and dramatic cliffs surrounding Hanalei Bay were used as a backdrop for the mythical Bali Hai in the movie version of South Pacific. 

Princeville is the primary commercial development in the area around Hanalei Bay and is home to several condominium, shopping center and resort developments, including the 252-room Princevill Resort, A Luxury Collection Resort, which was shuttered in September 2008 in order to undergo a $60-million “top to bottom” transformation.  When the hotel re-opens in July 2009, it will be rebranded as the St. Regis Princeville Resort, the first St. Regis property in the State.  St. Regis is the flagship brand of Starwood Hotels and Resorts.

Above:  The entrance to the Princeville at Hanalei development along the North Shore of the Island of Kauai.  Below:  A view of the new St. Regis Princeville Resort, which is scheduled to open in July 2009 following a nine-month, $60-million renovation.

  

Below:  A view of the stunning cliffs of “Bali Hai,” taken from the grounds of the Hanalei Bay Resort at Princeville.

To view previous entries in the “Where are the Feet?” category, click here.

Photos taken: 1/17/09 and 1/19/09

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Where are the feet today? 

The feet are relaxing poolside at a private residence at The Palms, a golf community, located in La Quinta, part of greater Palm Springs, CA.  The feet are enjoying a week-long Thanksgiving holiday getaway in sunny Palm Springs.

To learn more about Palm Springs or to plan your desert getaway, visit the Palm Springs Bureau of Tourism website by clicking here.

To view previous entries in the “Where are the Feet” series, click here.

Photo taken: 11/27/08

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet in these photos?

TOP:  The feet are relaxing at a private ghat, or bathing area, along the sacred Ganga (Ganges) River, at the Haveli Hari Ganga Hotel, in Haridwar, India.   

ABOVE:  The feet are relaxing, again, on the sandy banks of the Ganga River, in Rishikesh, India.

To view previous entries in the “Where are the Feet” series, click here.

Photos taken: 11/15/08 to 11/17/08

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet today?

The feet are standing atop a plaque commemorating the opening of the Millennium Bridge in London.

The Millennium Bridge is a pedestrian-only, steel suspension bridge that spans the Thames River in London, linking Banking with the City.  Construction of the bridge started in 1998, as one of several key projects intended to commemorate the New Millennium.  It is the first new bridge across the Thames River since the Tower Bridge was erected in 1894. 

To see other entries in the “Where are the Feet” series, click here.

Photos taken: 9/19/08

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Where are the Feet?

Where are the feet today? 

The feet are taking a brief rest while waiting for a train on the boarding platform in the Marble Arch Station in the London Underground (also called the Tube), the large metro transit system serving London.

Above:  The platform at the Marble Arch Underground Station.  Below: The Marble Arch, located in London’s Mayfair District, provides the name for the Marble Arch Station of the London Underground.

Here are some interesting tidbits on the London Underground:

*  It is the oldest underground railway, as well as oldest rapid transit system, in the world;
*  The earlier lines of the present Underground network, which were built by various private companies, became part of an integrated transport system (which excluded the main line railways) in 1933;
*  The system includes 268 stations and roughly 250 miles of track, making is the longest metro system in the world, based on route length;
*  In 2007, the Underground handled over 1 billion passenger journeys;
*  There are 11 lines in the system, which serves most of greater metropolitan London, as well as the neighboring areas of Essex, Hertfordshire, and Buchinghamshire;
*  The escalators in the Underground stations include some of the longest in Europe, the longest of which is at the Angel Station, measuring 197 feet, with a vertical rise of about 90 feet.

I’ve found that the London Underground is an effective and afforable way to navigate London, although the stations and trains are very crowded during peak hours, and some of the walkways within the station are narrow, long and maze-like. 

To see other, previous posts in the “Where are the Feet?” series, click here.

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Where are the feet today?

The feet are admiring the beautiful and whimsical mosaic tiles in the impressive lobby of Wynn Las Vegas.  In the photo below, Wynn artisans are carefully repairing and replacing some of the mosaic tiles which get damaged or lost under the stampede of guests and gawkers in the Wynn lobby.

To see other, previous posts in the “Where are the Feet?” series, click here.

Photo taken: 8/31/08

 

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Where are the feet today?

 

The feet are stepping into Caesars Las Vegas, which is undergoing further transformation, including the addition of a new $1-billion tower and additional convention space.  Hopefully, the project will also help to better unify the sprawling hotel-casino complex; if not, be sure to bring bread crumbs so you can find your way out of the labyrinth-like ground floor.

To see other, previous posts in the “Where are the Feet?” series, click here.

Photo taken: 8/31/08

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Where are the feet today?

The feet are pausing to admire the fountain and view of the Legion of Honor, one of the Fine Arts Museums in San Francisco, CA, on a rather foggy and damp day earlier this week.  The Legion of Honor is exhibiting the Women Impressionists show, through 9/21/08, featuring 140 works by Berthe Morisot, Mary Cassatt, Eva Gonzalès and Marie Bracquemond.

 

Here’s some information on the four featured artists, as described on the Legion of Honor website:

  • Berthe Morisot (1841–1895): Women Impressionists presents over 60 examples of Morisot’s works, including oil paintings, drawings, and pastels. Morisot was the only woman to exhibit in the first Impressionist exhibition in 1874, and she became one of the most prolific members of the Impressionist circle.
  • Mary Cassatt (1844–1926): Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Cassatt was the only American member of the Impressionist circle. Women Impressionists features over 35 works by Cassatt, including examples of her oil paintings, pastels, and prints.
  • Eva Gonzales(1849–1883): The only formal pupil of Edouard Manet, Gonzalès became known for her characteristic style of portraiture and her use of subtle emotion and richness of detail in her works. This exhibition presents approximately 15 works by Gonzalès, including the finest examples of her oil paintings and pastels.
  • Marie Bracquemond (1840–1916): Women Impressionists marks the most comprehensive exhibition of Marie Bracquemond’s work since a 1919 retrospective organized by her son Pierre at a Paris gallery. The exhibition features approximately 20 works by Bracquemond, including watercolors, drawings, and oil paintings.

Tickets for this very popular (and crowded) show are available online for timed entrance to the museum.  Avoid the largest crowds by visiting the museum at opening or late in the day.

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The feet are taking a brief break from the heat and humidity in New Orleans, LA to admire the view of historic Jackson Square (aka Place d’Armes), a National Historic Landmark, located in the middle of the French Quarter.  Built in 1814 and named in honor of Andrew Jackson, Jackson Square was designed by architect and landscaper Louis H. Pilie,  and modeled on the famous Place des Vosges in Paris, France.  

Today, Jackson Square is the “heart” of the French Quarter and a popular meeting place for residents and visitors.  Local artists and craftspersons line their works along the perimeter of the square, and horse-drawn carriages line up in front of the square offering rides to visitors.

A statue of Jackson was erected in the square in 1865, designed by artist Clark Mills (see photo below).

Photos taken: 8/9/08.

 To view other previous shown in the “Where are the Feet” series, click here.

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Where are the feet today?

The feet are perched on a wall at the observation platform overlooking the Kilauea caldera and Halemaumau crater in the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on the Island of Hawaii.  The current eruption in Halemaumau, which started 3/12/08, is the first eruption within the crater since 1982.  The plume of smoke shows the area where the vent is spewing gas and sulfur dioxide within the crater.  Unfortunately, as a result of high levels of sulfur dioxide, the nearby viewing platform, and road around the crater rim has temporarily been closed by the National Park Service.  Consequently, the closest viewing position is near Jaggar Museum, where this photo was taken. 

The feet keep moving.  Where are they now?

The feet are shown relaxing after lunch alongside a small stream and waterfall in Kolekole State Park, located along the picturesque Hamakua Coast on the Island of Hawaii.  The stream, which is located below Akaka Falls, empties into the ocean at the State Park.  After venturing closer to the shore, you can get a wonderful view of the rocky shoreline, which is typical of the Hamakua Coast.

 And, now, the feet are resting for a moment.  Where are they?

The feet are resting momentarily on the seawall along Alii Drive in Kailua-Kona on the Island of Hawaii, where there is a great view of Kailua Bay.  (The feet are shown alongside a cherished red lauhala hat, purchased ten years ago at the famous Kealakekua’s Grass Shack, in Kealakeakua, Island of Hawaii, .  The hat is paired with a handmade Hawaiian feather lei, from Aunty Mary Lou’s Na Lima Mili Hulu Noeau, in Kapahulu, Honolulu, HI, where the tradition of Hawaiian feather lei-making was kept alive.  Sadly, this shop is now closed.  Aloha oe.)

And, finally, the feet have gone wandering.  Where are they?

The feet have gone walking on the fine, white-sand Hapuna Beach, a 1/2-mile long beach fronting the Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel in Kohala, Island of Hawaii.  The beach has consistently been named one of the best beaches in the USA.  The sand at this beach is clean and super fine– definitely one of the most beautiful locations in Hawaii.

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Where are the feet today?

The feet are relaxing on the grassy area surrounding the beautiful fountain in Kapiolani Park, in Honolulu, with famous Diamond Head in the background. 

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The feet are…

Enjoying the ride in the huge ferris wheel located at the Hep Five Shopping Center complex in Osaka, Japan, December 2007.

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Those Feet Are Getting Around…  Where are they?

Photo A1 and A2

Photo B

Photo C:

Photo D:

Photo E:

Photo F:

Photo G:

Photo H:

And the feet were…

A = Standing inside an interactive exhibit at the Jewish Museum, Berlin, Germany, April, 2007.
B = Resting in a hotel room in the Park Hotel, Tokyo, Japan, December, 2007.
C = Standing on fallen Ginko Leaves in downtown Osaka, Japan, December, 2007.
D = Relaxing on the lawn outside the Schönbrunn Palace, Vienna, Austria, April, 2007.
E = Floating in the Pool at the Fours Seasons Resort at Jimbaran Bay, Bali, Indonesia, January, 2007.
F = Enjoying a (very) hot soak in the outdoor mineral foot bath at the Hakone Open Air Museum in Hakone, Japan, December, 2007.
G = Walking around the lobby of the Wynn Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada, January, 2008.
H = Resting on a bench outside historic Osaka Castle, Osaka, Japan, December, 2007.

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